High-tech fitness brings gym glasses to home

Ben Whetstone isn’t the only one in his push to consume fat, despite the fact that he exercises by himself in his garage.

“In the last 30 days I’ve covered 34 miles, burned 5,132 calories, and exercised using the Peloton devices about 7.5 hours,” he says.

Whetstone, a busy realtor in Apollo Beach, is among Peloton’s one million subscribers. He has the original spin bike and the new associated treadmill. Both stream high-end fitness classes live to the client.

“The system gamifies fitness. I think it’s definitely motivated me to use the treadmill and bike more than I would’ve otherwise,” he explained.

What’s more, Peloton, esteemed at $4 billion, isn’t the only one. Organizations like FightCamp, a home boxing gym, and Mirror, a home yoga studio that uses an extravagant magic-mirror, are likewise getting in on the associated fitness craze.

There is a major downside to this new tech: Wallet will get skinnier as well.

A Peloton bike will set back more than $2,000 and the treadmill around $5,000. There is additionally a $40 monthly fee.

Carlos Mercado plays coach and hype man during spin classes at the Spurlino YMCA in Riverview. He says there are a few things just a genuine class can replicate.

“It brings more energy, sustainability and it brings more confidence to a group as well. It reminds us we’re not alone in the battle,” he says.

Regardless of whether people want to go old school or they want to get fit the high-tech way, there’s good news: People don’t need to go far to find a decent partner.

Mark David

Mark David is a writer best known for his science fiction, but over the course of his life he published more than sixty books of fiction and non-fiction, including children's books, poetry, short stories, essays, and young-adult fiction. He publishes news on fitcurious.com related to the science.

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